Are Asians the New White?

mmm-turq-lg

Wikipedia defines the Model Minority Myth (MMM):
refers to a minority group (whether ethnic, racial, or religious) in certain countries whose members are most often perceived to achieve a higher degree of success than the population average. This success is typically measured in income, education, and related factors such as low crime rate and high family stability.”

Read the full post »

Afro Asian Liberation

Fred Ho - NYTimes

Fred Ho was a baritone saxophonist, composer, writer and activist who was known for the way he so eloquently, sometimes chaotically, fused jazz and traditional Chinese music to both captivate audiences and advance his political ideology. Drawn to the Black Power and Black Arts movements as a teenager, he began speaking out against injustices toward Blacks and Asians at an early age. As a young man, Ho focused more on activism than music, creating the East Coast Asian Students Union (while studying at Harvard) and later co-founding the Asian American Arts Alliance. When he took a class and was exposed to the writings of Malcolm X and other anti-oppression authors, this began to change the way that Ho saw himself. He adopted a Chinese American identity and sought not to assimilate but to walk his own path, a path that would eventually lead him back to music.
Read the full post »

Glossary: Asian Solidarity, an Invisible Race?

8XiZAt0

“Here is what I sometimes suspect my face signifies to other Americans: an invisible person, barely distinguishable from a mass of faces that resemble it. A conspicuous person standing apart from the crowd and yet devoid of any individuality. An icon of so much that the culture pretends to honor but that it in fact patronizes and exploits…a mass of stifled, repressed, abused, conformist quasi-robots who simply do not matter, socially or culturally…” Wesley Lang
Read the full post »

Cuba: Looking Ahead

Untitled-2 copy 2-3

Join us for a discussion about the changing Cuban landscape

Thursday, May 7th at 5PM at The New School

Visionary Organizing

Grace Lee Boggs’ message to Occupy Wall Street from American Revolutionary.

At the age of 96, Chinese American grassroots activist, organizer, philosopher and author Grace Lee Boggs has more than seven decades of experience in Civil Rights activism, the Black Power movement, feminism, labor rights, Asian American rights, and environmental and food justice. Boggs, along with her husband and fellow activist, James Boggs, founded Detroit Summer — a multiracial, inter-generational collective based in Detroit. This collective has been working to transform communities through youth leadership, creativity and collective action for over 20 years.

Read the full post »

#BlackLivesMatter

beauty

All over the country the #BlackLivesMatter movement has spread, making an impact here at The New School as well. I am only an ally to the cause; I don’t personally know what it is like to be Black in this country. However, I do know what it is like to be a person of color and the challenges that comes with it. I understand the discrimination communities of color face.
Read the full post »

Freedom Growers

Image Courtesy of Freedom Growers

Image Courtesy of Freedom Growers

In the pictures above, we see a beautiful farm and the founders of Feedom-Freedom Growers. Founders Myrtle and Wayne Curtis help their community by growing vegetables and fruits. They didn’t hire farmers or buy delivery trucks, instead they asked neighboring low-income communities to help them. People would come to the Curtis farm to help grow fruits and vegetables, while receiving getting food and groceries in exchange. Through the work of Feedom-Freedom Growers, Myrtle and Wayne Curtis transformed a neglected garbage lot, into an urban garden.
Read the full post »

Icons: Rastafarians

Musical group Israel Vibration

Musical group Israel Vibration

When the word Rastafarian comes to mind, many people tend to think of ganja smoking Jamaicans. Though being of Jamaican descent myself, I never took a closer look at the Rastafarian movement (I just knew my mother would kill me if I ever dated one). It wasn’t until I first watched the Bob Marley documentary Marley that I learned the rich set of principles that guides the Rastafarian way of life.

Read the full post »

Glossary: Environmental Racism

Image Courtesy of The Cross Roads Fund

Image Courtesy of The Cross Roads Fund

The trip through ER can be a scary, threatening and life changing experience for people of color.

I am not talking about a trip to the emergency room, but a trip through life for the people who have to deal with environmental racism. If you are unfamiliar, environmental racism is the oppression of people of color through environmental degradation. According to Do Something, African Americans are 79 percent more likely to live in areas with industrial waste facilities, compared to Whites. The effects of living within close proximity to toxic dumping sites can have long-term effects on community well-being, specifically affecting the neighborhood water, air, and food quality.
Read the full post »

Black & Angry

Image Courtesy of #ITooAmHarvard Campaign

Image Courtesy of #ITooAmHarvard Campaign

Avoid. Accommodate. Compromise. Repeat.

In their renowned text The Managerial Grid, Blake and Mouton describe 5 methods of coping with conflict: Collaborating, Competing, Accommodating, Avoiding and Compromising. Given racist stereotypes about Black people being violent, angry, and overly emotional – do African Americans choose too frequently to accommodate, avoid, and compromise to fit in? What are the consequences to their mental and physical health as a result?
Read the full post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,803 other followers