The Greatest

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                           Muhammad Ali (l.) and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. (r.) in Louisville                                 (AP Photo via The Nation)

“Like Muhammad Ali puts it, we are all—black and brown and poor—victims of the same system of oppression.” – Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Happy Birthday Muhammad Ali! Mainstream media continues to revere him for his extraordinary achievements as an athlete and his influential oratory style (How many of us have alleged to “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee”?).  However, Ali is beloved to the progressive community and the African diaspora for his candid criticism of racial discrimination and poverty as well as his refusal to be inducted in the US Army during the Vietnam War due to his religious beliefs.  Ali could have exercised his class privilege, entered the army and fought entertaining exhibition bouts without ever being in any physical danger.  Instead, he chose to take a principled stand which in the short run cost him millions of dollars and some of his peak years as a boxing champion.  In the long run, Ali’s example made him a legend.

To learn more about Muhammad Ali, see the Academy Award-winning film When we Were Kings, or read this Dave Zirin article in The Nation.

#MoralMonday

When I first heard the phrase “Moral Monday” on Twitter (#MoralMonday), I assumed it was a social media phenomenon like Throwback Thursday (#tbt), Friday Follow (#ff), or Caturday (#caturday). Instead, this catchy phrase has a much deeper and just purpose. It is a revival of 1960s Civil Rights Era activism and the old-school-style protests that took place in the South. This movement is pushing back on conservative policy changes that began in North Carolina in the early 2010’s that directly harm many already marginalized communities in the state.
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