Podcast: Schools or Prisons?

In some neighborhoods, public schools feel more like prisons than schools. In this episode, former social worker and attorney Helen Higginbotham discusses the policing of children in schools with BLACK AND CUBA director Robin J. Hayes.

Written/Directed/Produced by:
Ariana Arancibia
Phyllis Ellington
Echo Sutterfield

Executive Produced by:
Dr. Robin J. Hayes

Recorded in New York City at TNS_Logo1_Small_RGB

Podcast: What’s Art Got to Do With IT?

Can art help to erase racism? In this episode of BREAKING DOWN RACISM, dancer, choreographer and activist Paloma Mcgregor discusses how artists can be effective activists?

Produced/Written/Directed by: Crista Carter, Johanna Galomb and Benjamin Jackson

Host/Executive Producer/Series Creator Robin J. Hayes, PhD

Recorded at The New School in New York City

PICTURED Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, “Revelations” 2012 courtesy Alvin Ailey Theater

Podcast: Black Moms

In this episode of “Breaking Down Racism,” blogger and author GaBrilla Ballard opens up about how the challenges of discussing race with children and pushing aside stereotypical assumptions of what it means to be a Black Mom.

Produced by Azra Samiee
Directed by Chris Stafford
Written by Caroline Batzdorf
Host/Executive Producer Robin J. Hayes, PhD

Recorded at The New School in New York City.

Pictured Chicago mother and child. 1973. photographed by John H. White for the Environmental Protection Agency.

#TBT Podcast: Black or African American?

In this throwback to season 1 of the podcast series Breaking Down Racism, millenials ask: Why do some people prefer the term Black or African American do define their racial identity?

Produced by Javarius Jones
Executive Producer/Series Creator Robin J. Hayes, PhD
Directed by Dante Bailey
Written by Danielle Tascone

pictured actress/talk show host Raven-Symone who prefers to be identified as “American” rather than African American.

Alejandro de la Fuente’s Race, National Discourse, and Politics in Cuba: An Overview

TEACHERS: Alejandro de la Fuente’s Race, National Discourse, and Politics in Cuba: An Overview is an academic source that is essential to understanding the Cuban Revolution and post-revolution Cuba in terms of race. Integrate it easily into your classroom with our complete syllabus guide based on Black and Cuba!

http://blackandcuba.tumblr.com/CollegesandUniversities

Alejandro meme

Jafari Allen’s ¡Venceremos? The Erotics of Black Self-making in Cuba

EDUCATORS: Jafari Allen’s ¡Venceremos? The Erotics of Black Self-making in Cuba is a ground-breaking book that is essential to understanding the post-revolution Cuba in terms of issues of race, gender, sexuality, and so on. Integrate it easily into your classroom with our complete syllabus guide based on Black and Cuba!

http://blackandcuba.tumblr.com/CollegesandUniversities

Jafari meme

Amiri Baraka’s Cuba Libre

TEACHERS: Black radical Amiri Baraka’s groundbreaking 1966 essay Cuba Libre is a must-have for your class on Cuba and African Americans/Afro-Cubans this fall! Integrate it easily into your classroom with our complete syllabus guide based on Black and Cuba!

http://blackandcuba.tumblr.com/CollegesandUniversities

Andrea Smith, Rachel Dolezal and Reading Realness

(from l. to r.) Rachel Dolezal, Dorian Corey and Andrea Smith

(from l. to r.) Rachel Dolezal, Dorian Corey and Andrea Smith

I am, in the words of Black twitter, #ActualBlack.  I say this not to endorse “identity policing” but to point out:

  1. I have parents, grandparents and great grandparents who were forced to cope with the following forms of White supremacy (in chronological order): the TransAtlantic Slave Trade, lynching, segregation, mass incarceration, and microaggressions.
  2. My body, skin, hair, voice, accent (or lack of accent), sashay, and personal aesthetics are to some degree disturbing in all public and private institutions (except for prisons and the morgue).
  3. I did not sign up for this club, but I am proud to be a member.

In all seriousness,  I have been thinking a lot about  the question: Why has the outing of Rachel Dolezal and Andrea Smith as  White – allegedly – caused such a sensation?

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Women, Race and Revolution

An image of Carlota with a machete.

Black women around the world and throughout history have fought for their freedom and inclusion in society. In the United States, we are most familiar with the likes of Rosa Parks, Ella Baker and Claudette Colvin – African American women leaders that fought for Civil Rights throughout the 1960s. The struggle for freedom in the Americas actually started much earlier than that. Today marks the anniversary of a Cuban revolution that began nearly a century before Fidel Castro and Che Guevara’s July 26th Movement. Carlota, who predates both Guevara and Castro, was one of several female Africans responsible for leading a string of successful slave uprisings in Cuba from 1843-44. The freedom of her compatriots would eventually cost Carlota her life.

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