It’s Gonna Be Alright Palante Siempre Palante

This time of year I tend to congratulate myself about what I have managed to accomplish during the summer and soothe myself with gelato about the things on my to-do list that will have to be pushed back into Fall.  All of us who are doing important work – either as educators, artists, activists, students or volunteers – have more passion than money — more good ideas than time to execute them.  What’s the best way to surrender to this reality dishonoring our spirit?

At the Progressive Pupil office this summer, we’ve been listening to Kendrick Lamar’s ‘It’s Gonna Be Alright” on repeat.  This song, which has become the unofficial theme of #BlacklLivesMatter, is an affirmation that has long been passed down from grandmother to grandchild in African American communities.  In spite of all the challenges we who believe in freedom face, and the dark truths that must be confronted in doing this work with integrity, it’s gonna be alright.

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Capturing Puerto Rico: a “Nation on the Move”

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Those who study Puerto Rico are familiar with the phrase La nación en vaivén (Nation on the move). This phrase described the Puerto Rican diaspora, how Puerto Ricans would move “back and forth” between the Caribbean island, the United States and elsewhere.
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Icons: The Rock Steady Crew

The Rock Steady Crew

The Rock Steady Crew

Breakdancing is just one element of hip hop culture that can trace its origins to the low-income areas of the Bronx. It was started by Black and Puerto Rican youth in the 1970s. I was born and raised in Queens, New York during the early 1980s. Though Queens was not an area where hip hop culture dominated, I still have faint memories of my first introduction to hip hop and breakdancing.

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The Racial State of Puerto Rico

Demonstrating for statehood, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Demonstrating for statehood, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

With the structure of race, ethnicity, and culture in the United States, Afro Latinos often have a difficult time maintaining and celebrating both sides of their racial identity. From assumptions based on skin color to strict categorization in surveys and standardized testing, those of mixed heritages are often told that they need to pick a side. A study by the State University of New York at Albany found that “Hispanics who define themselves as ‘black’ have lower incomes and are more likely to reside in segregated neighborhoods than those who identify themselves as ‘white’ or ‘other.’” Even in multi-ethnic states, such as California, Afro Latinos feel pressure to choose sides or find themselves lumped into one category or another instead of being accepted as both Black and Latino.

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