Negr@ & Beautiful

Former intern Carmen Medina and her aunt Tamara. Photo taken by Carmen Medina.

Former intern Carmen Medina and her aunt Tamara. Photo taken by Carmen Medina.

Are you AfroLatin@ and beautiful? Snap a selfie or childhood photo and email us a 100 word caption about what makes you Negr@ & Beautiful. You can be a part of our AfroLatin@ Heritage celebration on the Progressive Pupil blog this September and October. Whether you’ve grown to love your hair, work hard as a teacher in an urban school or are involved in campaigns for immigrants’ rights and against mass incarceration, we want to see you and learn about you. If you are an artist, musician or filmmaker, be sure to include information about your latest project. Our former intern Carmen Medina wrote about her journey to self-love on our blog and was later featured on AfroLatinidad. You can learn more about AfroLatino community advocacy from the afrolatin@ forum.

The Story of a Morena Boriqueña

A version of this post was originally published on February 29, 2012

I remember going to church as a child and understanding that I was different.  My abuela and I used to go to a Pentecostal church that was mostly white Latinos, but I had darker skin.  I would see the Pastor’s wife and I yearned to look like her.  In my eyes, she had milky white skin and silky hair to her ankles.  Though she never knew this, I would go home, look in the mirror and wonder why my skin was darker and my hair was significantly shorter than hers.  I did not understand what it was to be Latina and black.

Puerto Ricans are descendants of Africans, Europeans and the indigenous Tainos, so it shouldn’t be surprising that Puerto Ricans come in many colors.

Me and my aunt Tamara. Photo taken by Carmen Medina.

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The Story of a Morena Boriqueña

I remember going to church as a child and understanding that I was different.  My abuela and I used to go to a Pentecostal church that was mostly white Latinos, but I had darker skin.  I would see the Pastor’s wife and I yearned to look like her.  In my eyes, she had milky white skin and silky hair to her ankles.  Though she never knew this, I would go home, look in the mirror and wonder why my skin was darker and my hair was significantly shorter than hers.  I did not understand what it was to be Latina and black.

Puerto Ricans are descendants of Africans, Europeans and the indigenous Tainos, so it shouldn’t be surprising that Puerto Ricans come in many colors.

(more…)